Thank you, Seanet

This week I did something that can be risky and even traumatic for a small business: I changed my internet service provider.

This was particularly tough for me because I’d been with Seanet, one of the best ISPs in Seattle, for about 15 years. They installed DSL at my house in Wallingford at a time when I was one of the first broadband customers in North Seattle. Ten  years ago, when a change in DSL service required that I move from another telecom service to Qwest service, they walked me through it. And when the old DSL service got shut off before the new service got turned on, they went to extraordinary lengths so that my business was online and none of my clients were inconvenienced (this was in days before coffee shop wifi).

However, I no longer use the email and hosting features of my Seanet account. And Qwest technical support service has improved to the point that I am willing to let them handle the ISP portion of my account (which I’d been paying for, but didn’t use.) It was a way to save a significant chunk of change every year.

At any rate, it’s done. I’m completely shifted over to Qwest service, and just had a very pleasant farewell call with Seanet. I’ll sure miss them.

Terry Pratchett’s “Shaking Hands with Death”

Whatever your views on death, if you are a writer, you can’t help but admire the speech by Sir Terry Pratchett. It was read Feb. 1 on BBC1 by Tony Robinson.

Imagine a very, very slow-motion car crash. Nothing much seems to be happening. There’s an occasional little bang, a crunch, a screw pops out and spins across the dashboard as if we’re in Apollo 13. But the radio is still playing, the heater is on and it doesn’t seem all that bad, except for the certain knowledge that sooner or later you will definitely be going headfirst through the windscreen.

Whatever your views on death, if you are a writer, you can’t help but admire this speech by Sir Terry Pratchett, given as a Richard Dimbleby lecture. It was read Feb. 1 on BBC1 by Tony Robinson.

Old media 1, Amazon 0

Read novelist John Scalzi’s color commentary on the Amazon vs. MacMillan catfight this weekend.

Three reasons to read novelist John Scalzi’s color commentary on the Amazon vs. Macmillan catfight this weekend:

1. You followed the Tweets and blog posts documenting the mysterious disappearance of one-sixth of Amazon.com’s books (those published by Macmillan) from the website Friday evening and want to know what was going on behind the scenes.

2. You tried to ignore the back and forth, but want to know how it ended and why.

3. You are a public relations or marketing professional and you want to follow along as Scalzi documents all the ways that Amazon set the scene for a PR disaster and  made things worse every single step of the way.

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